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Wildlife Resources

Wildlife Contacts

Wildlife Rehab Center | 616-361-6109 | wildliferehabcenter.org

Lowell Farm & Wildlife Center | 616-883-4223 | farmwildlife.org

Click here for a list of other Michigan Licensed Rehabilitators

Creature Control LLC | 616-916-4176 | creaturecontrol.net

Advantage Animal Control | 616-901-2212 | advantageanimalcontrol.com

Wildlife Removal Grand Rapids | 616-591-5641 | grandrapidswildlife.com

Critter Control | 616-202-2606 | grandrapids.crittercontrol.com

Grand Rapids Pest Control | 616-784-2888 | grandrapidspest.com

Smitter Pest Control | 616-245-7215 | smitterpestcontrolmanagement.com

American Pest Solutions | 616-430-7062 | americanpestsolutionsinc.com

Kent County Sheriff’s Office | 616-632-6100 | accesskent.com

Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office | 800-249-0911 | miottawa.org

Michigan State Police | 616-866-4411 | michigan.gov

Humane Society of West Michigan | 616-453-8900 | hswestmi.org

Kent County Animal Shelter | 616-632-7304 | accesskent.com

Kent County Health Department | 616-632-7100 | accesskent.com

Animal Emergency Hospital | 616-361-9911 | westmichiganaeh.com

Wildlife Information

There are over 8,240 species of reptiles and 6,500 amphibians in the world! There are 10 species of turtles, 18 species of snakes and only 2 species of lizards for a total of 30 reptile species in Michigan. There are 12 species of frogs, 12 species of salamanders and only 2 species of toads for a total of 26 amphibian species in Michigan.

All reptiles:

  • are vertebrates. This means they have a backbone or spine.
  • are “ectothermic” or cold-blooded. Ectothermic animals cannot regulate their body temperature, meaning they seek warmer or cooler habitats depending on their body temperature.
  • are covered with dry scales.
  • lay soft-shelled eggs.
  • have the presence of at least 1 permanent lung unlike their amphibian relatives.

All amphibians:

  • are vertebrates. This means they have a backbone or spine.
  • are “ectothermic” or cold-blooded. Ectothermic animals cannot regulate their body temperature, meaning they seek warmer or cooler habitats depending on their body temperature.
  • are covered with moist, permeable skin (molecules and gases can pass through).
  • spend part of their lives in water and on land.
  • lay gelatinous eggs in a moist environment.
  • have gills for part of their lives.

It is illegal to care for baby reptiles and amphibians without proper permits from the federal government. Please leave baby reptiles & amphibians alone if you find them as it is normal for them to receive no parental care as babies. If they are in a dangerous location (such as a highway), move them to the edge of a wetland but do not take them home.

Birds are vertebrate animals adapted for flight. Many can also run, jump, swim, and dive. Some, like penguins, have lost the ability to fly but retained their wings. Birds are found worldwide and in all habitats. The largest is the nine-foot-tall ostrich. The smallest is the two-inch-long bee hummingbird.

All birds:

  • are vertebrates. This means they have a backbone or spine.
  • are “endothermic” or warm-blooded. Endothermic animals can regulate their body temperature, allowing them to live in a various habitats.
  • are covered in feathers.
  • lay eggs and hatch their young.
  • have wings.
  • have beaks or bills.

Birds make their nests in all kinds of places, from trees, to shrubs, to nest boxes, to overhangs on your house, and even in your laundry vent. If possible, wait till the birds are able to fly before disturbing the nest, which can take a few weeks. When it comes to baby birds, there are two types of babies: precocial and altricial:

  • Precocial baby birds are born with down feathers and their eyes are open. They are able to walk and swim right away with their mother and can eat on their own. They still spend time with their parents but are less needy than altricial babies.
  • Altricial baby birds are born featherless and have their eyes closed. They require a lot of help from their parents since they cannot walk, fly, or eat on their own yet.

It is illegal to care for baby birds without proper permits from the federal government. Please view the graphic below to see what to do if you find a baby bird.

Baby-Bird-640x480

There are over 4,000 species of mammals in the world! Michigan is home to about 65 species of mammals. Large mammals such as bears, white-tailed deer, moose and coyotes roam our state. Smaller Michigan mammals include flying squirrels, mice and bats.

All mammals:

  • are vertebrates. This means they have a backbone or spine.
  • are “endothermic” or warm-blooded. Endothermic animals can regulate their body temperature, allowing them to live in various habitats.
  • are covered in hair or fur.
  • produce milk for their young. This allows them to spend time teaching their babies survival skills.
  • have 3 inner ear bones (hammer, anvil & the stirrup) within the middle ear.

Mammal babies are born naked with their eyes shut and require a lot of care from their parents. It is illegal to capture and raise baby animals as pets without proper permits. Doing so is dangerous in the following ways:

  • Misfeeding can lead to dietary issues and health problems
  • Mammals can carry a variety of dieases
  • Baby mammals can imprint which makes it easier to be hunted or injured

Blandford’s Wildlife

Click on the buttons below for more facts on these animal groups and to see the live Wildlife Ambassadors we have here at Blandford!